Frequently asked questions

1. How loud will the new wash be? What will the vibration impact back?

All noise and vibration must adhere to Network Rail railway standards and the Rail Safety and Standards Board’s guidelines. Both take their regulations from the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and The Railways Act 1993.

The current decibel measurement is c.40db at the garden fence of the worse affected properties. This should be reduced further by the proposed cladding to the enclosure and we will carry out further noise testing when the wash has been constructed.

For further details on standards referenced see: https://cdn.networkrail.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/NR_CAT_STP_001-Issue-110.pdf

2. Will there be light pollution?

All lighting must adhere to Network Rail railway standards and the Rail Safety and Standards Board’s guidelines. Both of these take their regulations from the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and The Railways Act 1993.

We have removed old 30-foot gantry lights which had a considerable impact, and replaced them with lower lighting, focused on walkways, minimising the impact and energy waste. These will have light sensors to further reduce energy waste and impact.

Low-level lights along the access road will be facing away from the properties, focused downwards.

For further details on standards referenced see: https://cdn.networkrail.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/12/NR_CAT_STP_001-Issue-110.pdf

3. How big is the carriage wash?

The carriage wash itself will be housed inside an enclosure. Although not designed in detail yet, the enclosure will be approximately 8m high, 7m wide and 34m long, with a triangular roof.

4. Why can’t the carriage wash be built at Cambridge North?

Network Rail through the Thameslink Programme was delivering enhancements at the Cambridge Depot facility prior to 2016. The scope of these enhancements related to the provision of an increased and upgraded stabling and servicing facility to accommodate class 700 trains being introduced by the Thameslink Programme.

When GA won the franchise in 2016 it was necessary to revisit the original Depot Programme and to see if both GTR and GA operational needs could be accommodated at the current depot location at Cambridge.

The land at Cambridge North (also known as Chesterton Sidings) was identified as being suitable for commercial development from early 2010 and included the construction of the new Cambridge North Station. Network Rail worked with the County Council and other local authorities to progress this and the land was sold.

 

 

5. How many trains will use the wash every night?

We anticipate up to 33 inbound and outbound trains into the sidings on weekdays, however not every carriage or vehicle will require to use the carriage wash.
The main hours of operation will be 18:00 – 06:00, and estimates show that no more than 4 trains per hour will use the wash during these times.

6. What role is Govia Thameslink Railway playing in this upgrade?

Govia Thameslink Railway is delivering and managing the project on behalf of Network Rail. The depot itself is managed by Greater Anglia.

7. How was planning permission awarded?

Govia Thameslink Railway is not directly involved in the planning application process – this responsibility sits with Network Rail.

The full works were reviewed on the project; the works that sat outside of Part 8 of the General Permitted Development Order required pre-application process (18/1372/CAP18); others including the carriage wash were considered under the permitted development order.

8. What role is Govia Thameslink Railway playing in this upgrade?

Govia Thameslink Railway is delivering and managing the project on behalf of the Department For Transport. The depot itself is managed by Greater Anglia.

9. What are doing to minimise the visual impact?

Govia Thameslink Railway is not directly involved in the planning application process – this responsibility sits with Network Rail.

The full works were reviewed on the project; the works that sat outside of Part 8 of the General Permitted Development Order required pre-application process (18/1372/CAP18); others including the carriage wash were considered under the permitted development order. This is from Section 16 of the Railway Causes Consolidation Act 1845, which is why a Certificate of Lawful Development is not required.

Read Network Rail’s response here https://www.cambridgeraildepotupgrade.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/Network-Rail’s-response-to-Greater-Cambridge-Planning.pdf